IRIS PLEASE COME HOME

I love flowers, their colours, textures, design shapes and fragrances, but often I just love their funny names. So when Dennis suggested we have a mid-Saturday morning coffee at the local Flower Power garden centre at Taren Point I jumped at the chance.

I have a little garden on the balcony of my unit. Sometimes it looks really pretty,  colourful and pleasing to the eye but other times the birds, attracted by the bright colours, rip up the plants and leave a mess. I’ve just replanted and am eagerly awaiting the first signs of growth. 

At the garden centre the flowers are all doing their thing calling out to the pollinators “Come get me now I want to reproduce.” The bees, wasps, butterflies, moths, beetles, and birds take up the call. It’s a fun time for all.

Having had a coffee or two we wander through the gardens taking in all the joy of the bloomers, the pinks, yellows, reds, and mauve. I notice a Brazilian Walking Iris as shown in the picture above. 

I use to have a Walking Iris at home but as the name implies she was prone to walking. The first time it happened I found her in the lounge room watching the television. It was a garden show so I didn’t give it a second thought. In fact I thought it was cute.

I put her back out on the balcony but every few days she would go out for a walk. The neighbours told me they saw her hanging out with a gang that live a few houses down. With action names like climbing rose, Zebrina the wandering dew, creeping myrtle and Banksia the prostrate grevillea (whose origins are unclear) I should have known there was going to be trouble. 

I was fond of Iris and her glossy green arching leaves, some  were more than 24 inches long. She had this habit where from spring to late summer she would flower. The flowers lasted only for one day and if I was away I missed them. But when I returned she produced multiple blooms from the same stem in rapid succession. She knew that made me happy.

I also loved her grassy clump which could grow up to 5 feet wide and equally high when she became excited. I kept her in a hanging basket so this didn’t happen and she never got to grow to that size.

Together we had lots of youngsters because propagation for her was very easy. Her finished blooms developed air roots from which a small plant grew. The young ones were so attached to their mother I had to snip and re-pot them to give her some peace. 

Look I don’t know why she left. Maybe the gang down the street put ideas into her arching leaves or maybe I didn’t give her enough water or maybe like me survival was her top priority and perhaps she has walked all the way back to Brazil in search of her family roots. 

My neighbours think both she and I have gone potty but I don’t care what they say I still really miss Iris.

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4 thoughts on “IRIS PLEASE COME HOME

  1. You are a big big-funny man Sean! And well-potted like some say!

    You are also a wonderful man who makes wonderful posts to share with us. We are blessed because you are. (Iris how could you have left this man? I’ll never understand. Under-wonder-wander-lust I suppose.)

    You have a gift, and we see it in everything you post here Sean. So so tired tonight and you made me laugh! One more good deed! Then all these colors for show and tell. Good job Sean.

    I’m a little afraid to look in my garden right now. After all the rain and soon California Spring, who knows what the plants are up to now! Although I’ve been eyeing a blackberry vine.

  2. Ha ha there is no end to your wonderful imagination….so funny…..why dont you tell everyone about how pilley used to come out and watch tv with you:)))

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